C H O C F R O R I C A N A

fauxboy:

jonablin:

megamadridista4life:

Adventure Time - Food Chain (Sneak Peek)

This episode is animated by Masaaki Yuasa, a guest animator. The episode is considered non-canon.

Synopsis: On a field trip to the Candy Kingdom Museum of Natural History, Finn and Jake learn about the Food Chain by becoming the food chain! 

Also Magic Man is in the episode.

The preview aired at WonderCon.

PLEASE WATCH THIS THIS IS SO AMAZING

I love this show

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

oystergirlrhymes:

This semester I went to the White Privilege Conference in Madison, WI for my honors seminar about examining privilege. I made a poster about the behaviors of particular white female musicians who appropriate other cultures as a means of identity and sexualize/objectify WOC as a means of displaying sexual agency and social power. All under the guise of “empowerment”.


This is my take on the knowledge I found through seminar and readings, (esp. online articles) so in no way do I claim these ideas or concepts as my own.

How are the black panthers different from the KKK? Publicly shouting that we need to kill cracker babies is somehow okay because the group is black? Do you realize how fucking dumb you sound?

torisoulphoenix:

sbrown82:

torisoulphoenix:

un3ndingtragedy:

nikkisshadetree:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

When was the last time the Black panthers Lynched anyone?
-Elijah

When’s the last time the Black Panthers burned crosses in someone’s yard?

When’s the last time the Black Panthers completely destroyed white towns for fear of their prosperity?

Have the panthers ever burned down any white schools to keep white people “in their place”?

Are these white folks serious?! Please, please…do yourselves a favor and earn some citations on this country’s history. The Black Panthers were NOT like the Klu Klux Klan. Their objective was not to go around and terrorize and murder white people. The KKK however, was definitely a reactionary terrorist/extremist group. The Klan emerged during “The Nadir” (the lowest point) in 1877, after poor and disenfranchised whites stomped out Reconstruction and Blacks ultimately lost their civil rights. White people losing their mobility in this country was the core reason for terrorizing African Americans, but after that bullshit, 15 reels, massive 3-hour long movie “The Birth of a Nation" was released in 1915, now all of a sudden, Black people became barraged with this false image of themselves as threatening, violent, and barbaric, particularly to white women in society (The New Negro Crime) which ultimately led to hundred of thousands of lynchings and murders of Blacks in America. The Klan had one objective, to exterminate Black people. They spurred false rhetoric, hate, and violence…that’s it!

The Black Panthers was a revolutionary socialist organization that started in the mid-1960’s in Oakland, CA aiming to PROTECT the Black community. They were against police brutality, imperialism, capitalism or anything they felt was detrimental to Black Americans. They wanted Black people to fend for themselves, that’s why they carried guns, and they used them cautiously. They helped the sick, the poor, single mothers and their children, they even implemented a free ambulance and breakfast program in the community, yet they’re like the KKK?! Their goals were simple: quality education, housing, employment, and civil rights.They were not a violent group and neither was Malcolm X, contrary to popular opinion, they just believed in their right to self defense.The bottom line is, The Black Panther Party was a mobilization by African Americans, and people of the African descent across the world to break down institutionalized oppression by any means necessary. And FYI, many whites supported like Marlon Brando, and others.

*Don’t disrespect my people and Blackness!

image

GIRL, YOU BETTA SAY THAT SHIT!!!!!!

image